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Overweight and obesity

Overweight and obesity

Overweight and obese youth are likely to stay obese into adulthood. They are more likely to have risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, such as high cholesterol or high blood pressure. They are also at greater risk for bone and joint problems, fatty liver disease and sleep apnea. Obesity can also lead to social and psychological impacts such as stigmatisation, poor body image, low self-esteem and low confidence. Overweight and obesity, however, are largely preventable by adopting an active and healthy lifestyle. 
 
For more information on overweight and obesity among youth, please refer to the following websites: 
Student Health Service
Change 4 Health 
 
Statistics on Overweight and Obesity among Local Youth
 
(1)  Overweight and obesity detection rate of primary school students by sex from school year 2008/09 to 2017/18.
 
In Hong Kong, the overall overweight and obesity detection rate among primary school students decreased gradually from 22.2% in school year 2008/09, to 17.6% in 2017/18. Over the past decade, overweight and obesity detection rate was consistently higher in boys than in girls.
 
(2)  Overweight and obesity detection rate of secondary school students by sex from school year 2008/09 to 2017/18.
 
In Hong Kong, the overall overweight and obesity detection rate among secondary school students increased from 17.7% in school year 2008/09 onwards to 19.9% in 2017/18. Over the past decade, overweight and obesity detection rate was consistently higher in boys than in girls.
 
Notes:
  • Overweight (including obesity) is defined as: weight exceeding 120% of the median weight-for-height for male students with height between 55 and 175 cm and for female students with height between 55 and 165 cm; and BMI ≥25 for male students with height >175cm and for female students with height >165cm.
  • These growth standards were developed locally according to the findings of a territory-wide survey on 25 000 individuals ranging from birth to 18 years old conducted in 1993 by the Department of Health, the Hospital Authority and the Chinese University of Hong Kong.
  • * In school year 2009/10, Student Health Service had to take part in the Human Swine Influenza Vaccination Programme, and therefore annual appointments were only provided to Primary 1 to Secondary 1 students. As such, the detection rate of secondary school students for school year 2009/10 used the average of the school year 2008/09 and school year 2010/11.
Source of data: 
Data based on anthropometric measurement of primary and secondary students attending Student Health Service Centres of the Department of Health.