Skip to content

Frequently Asked Questions on Seasonal Influenza Vaccine 2018/19

Frequently Asked Questions on Seasonal Influenza Vaccine 2018/19

2018-09-10
  1. What is influenza?
  2. What is the difference between seasonal and pandemic influenza?
  3. Why is seasonal influenza vaccination important?
  4. Who should receive seasonal influenza vaccination?
  5. Who should have higher priority for seasonal influenza vaccination?
  6. I do not belong to any recommended priority group for 2018/19 seasonal influenza vaccine. Should I receive 2018/19 seasonal influenza vaccine?
  7. Why should pregnant women receive seasonal influenza vaccination?
  8. Why should obese persons (BMI 30 or above) receive seasonal influenza vaccine?
  9. Why should persons aged 50 or above receive seasonal influenza vaccine?
  10. Why should health care workers receive seasonal influenza vaccination?
  11. Why should poultry industry workers receive seasonal influenza vaccine?
  12. Why should pig farmers and pig-slaughtering personnel receive seasonal influenza vaccine?
  13. Why children aged 6 months to 11 years are recommended to receive seasonal influenza vaccine?
  14. What is the recommended composition of the 2018/19 seaesonal influenza vaccine?
  15. What types of sesonal influenza vaccines are registered in Hong Kong?
  16. What are the differences between inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)?
  17. Who should not receive inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV)?
  18. Who should not receive live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)?
  19. What is Guillain-Barré syndrome? Can influenza vaccination cause Guillain-Barré syndrome?
  20. Can I receive seasonal influenza vaccine if I had history of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS)?
  21. Does seasonal influenza vaccine cause influenza?
  22. What are the possible side effects of the inactivated influenza vaccine?
  23. What are the possible side effects of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)?
  24. How do seasonal influenza vaccines work?
  25. Does the seasonal influenza vaccine work right away?
  26. How much protection does the seasonal influenza vaccine provide?
  27. Is it necessary to get vaccinated against seasonal influenza every year?
  28. How many doses of seasonal influenza vaccination will my child need?
  29. If a child under the age of 9 years is getting seasonal influenza vaccine for the first time and requires 2 doses, does the same type of vaccine have to be used for both doses?
  30. Can pneumococcal vaccines be received together with seasonal influenza vaccine?
  31. Can my child receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if he / she has received / will receive other immunisation?
  32. My child has asthma. Should he avoid the influenza vaccination in case it gives him an attack?
  33. Is it necessary to re-vaccinate with the quadrivalent seasonal influenza vaccine if I have already got the trivalent one?
  34. How to choose the trivalent or quadrivalent vaccine? How much is the difference in protection between them?
  35. Do the influenza vaccines in Hong Kong contain a mercuric compound or aluminum?
  36. Why do some people who have been vaccinated still get influenza / influenza-like illness?

1. What is infection?

Influenza is an infectious viral disease.  It can be caused by various types of influenza viruses.  In Hong Kong, the two subtypes of influenza A virus, H1N1 and H3N2, and influenza B virus, are most commonly seen.  Influenza occurs in Hong Kong throughout the year, but is usually more common in periods from January to March/April and from July to August.  The virus mainly spreads by respiratory droplets.  The disease is characterised by fever, sore throat, cough, headache, muscle aches, runny nose and general tiredness. It is usually self-limiting with recovery in two to seven days.  However, if persons with weakened immunity and elderly persons get infected, it can be a serious illness and may be complicated by bronchitis, pneumonia or even death in the most serious cases. Serious influenza infection can also occur in healthy individuals.

2. What is the difference between seasonal and pandemic influenza?

Seasonal influenza refers to the viruses that circulate in the human population and cause widespread illnesses especially during each influenza season.  Pandemic influenza occurs rarely, when a new influenza virus emerges which is markedly different from those already circulating in the human population.  It causes disease in people and spreads easily between people because they have little or no immunity to it.

3. Why is seasonal influenza vaccination important?

Seasonal influenza vaccination is one of the effective means to prevent seasonal influenza and its complications, as well as reduce influenza related hospitalisation and death.

4. Who should receive seasonal influenza vaccination?

Given that influenza vaccines are safe and effective and severe cases can occur even in healthy persons, all members of the public aged 6 months or above, except those with known contraindications, should receive seasonal influenza vaccine for personal protection.

5. Who should have higher priority for seasonal influenza vaccination?

People who are in the priority groups are generally at increased risk of severe influenza or transmitting influenza to those at high risk. Therefore, they should have higher priority for seasonal influenza vaccination.

In 2018/19, the Scientific Committee on Vaccine Preventable Diseases recommends the following priority groups for seasonal influenza vaccination in Hong Kong:

  • Pregnant women
  • Elderly persons living in residential care homes
  • Long-stay residents of institutions for persons with disability
  • Persons aged 50 years or above
  • Persons with chronic medical problems*
  • Health care workers
  • Children between the age of 6 months to 11 years
  • Poultry workers
  • Pig farmers and pig-slaughtering industry personnel
* People with chronic medical problems mainly refer to those who have chronic cardiovascular (except hypertension without complication), lung, metabolic or kidney diseases, obesity# (BMI 30 or above), who are immunocompromised^, children and adolescents (aged 6 months to 18 years) on long-term aspirin therapy, and those with chronic neurological condition that can compromise respiratory function or the handling of respiratory secretions or that can increase the risk for aspiration or those who lack the ability to care for themselves.

# Obesity is considered as an independent risk factor for influenza complication and thus people with BMI 30 or above are included in the priority groups for seasonal influenza vaccination.

^ People who are immunocompromised refer to those with a weakened immune system due to disease (such as HIV/AIDS) or treatment (such as cancer treatment).

Members of the public can consult their family doctors to receive seasonal influenza vaccination for personal protection.

6. I do not belong to any recommended priority group for 2018/19 seasonal influenza vaccine. Should I receive 2018/19 seasonal influenza vaccine?

According to the World Health Organization, when the vaccine strains closely match the circulating influenza viruses, efficacy of influenza vaccine in individuals younger than 65 years of age typically range from 70% to 90%. Given that severe cases do occur in previously healthy persons, all members of the public aged 6 months or above, except those with known contraindications, should receive seasonal influenza vaccine for personal protection. Members of the public can consult their family doctors to receive seasonal influenza vaccination for personal protection.

7. Why should pregnant women receive seasonal influenza vaccination?

Influenza vaccination in pregnant women has shown benefits for both mother and child in terms of reduced acute respiratory infections. The World Health Organization considers inactivated influenza vaccine is safe in pregnancy and there is no evidence showing such vaccine can cause abnormality in foetus even if given during the first trimester. However, pregnant women should not receive live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) because it contains a live virus. Pregnant women should consult a doctor for any queries.

8. Why should obese persons (BMI 30 or above) receive seasonal influenza vaccine?

Local and overseas evidence suggested that obesity is an independent risk factor for severe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection including intensive care unit admission or death. As the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus is a common type of seasonal influenza virus, obese individual with BMI 30 or above is regarded as having a high-risk condition and is therefore recommended for  influenza vaccination.

9. Why should persons aged 50 or above receive seasonal influenza vaccine?

Persons aged 50-64 should receive seasonal influenza vaccination because local influenza epidemiology showed that people aged 50–64 years, irrespective of high-risk conditions, were having a higher risk of intensive care unit admission and death associated with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 is a common type of seasonal influenza virus.

The Scientific Committee on Vaccine Preventable Diseases recommends seasonal influenza vaccination for elderly persons aged 65 years or above because of their high risk of complications, excess hospital admissions and death from influenza.

10. Why should health care workers receive seasonal influenza vaccination?

The Scientific Committee on Vaccine Preventable Diseases recommends health care workers to receive seasonal influenza vaccination to reduce morbidity and hence reduce absenteeism among health care workers related to respiratory infections. It is also recommended in order to reduce the risk of transmitting influenza to patients who are at high risk of complications and mortality from influenza.

11. Why should poultry industry workers receive seasonal influenza vaccine?

Poultry industry workers have higher chance of contacting avian influenza viruses. Influenza vaccination can prevent seasonal influenza in humans, and hence minimise the chance of concomitant infections of human seasonal influenza and avian influenza viruses in humans. This in turn minimise the risk of genetic re-assortment and eventual emergence of a novel influenza A virus.

12. Why should pig farmers and pig-slaughtering industry personnel receive seasonal influenza vaccine?

Researchers previously detected influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (formerly known as Human Swine Influenza) viruses in pigs sampled in Hong Kong. Local experts considered that the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus detected in pigs was transmitted from humans to pigs. Swine influenza viruses circulating in pigs might infect humans in rare occasions. Influenza vaccination of the pig-related industry workers can prevent seasonal influenza among them, and hence minimise the chance of concomitant infections of human seasonal influenza and swine influenza viruses in either humans or pigs. This in turn minimise the risk of genetic re-assortment and eventual emergence of a novel influenza A virus.

13. Why children aged 6 months to 11 years are recommended to receive seasonal influenza vaccine?

Seasonal influenza vaccination is recommended for children 6 months to 11 years for reducing influenza related complications such as excess hospitalisations or deaths. Studies in overseas have shown that vaccinating young school children may potentially reduce school absenteeism and influenza transmission in the community.

14. What is the recommended composition of the 2018/19 seasonal influenza vaccine?

The quadrivalent influenza vaccine recommended by the Scientific Committee on Vaccine Preventable Diseases for the 2018/19 season contains the following:

  • an A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
  • an A/Singapore/INFIMH-16-0019/2016 (H3N2)-like virus
  • a B/Colorado/06/2017-like virus
  • a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like virus

If trivalent influenza vaccine is being used, the influenza B component shall contain a B/Colorado/06/2017-like virus.

15. What types of seasonal influenza vaccines are registered in Hong Kong?

Two types of seasonal influenza vaccines are currently registered in Hong Kong.  Inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are available as trivalent and quadrivalent injectable vaccines, whereas a live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) that was registered in Hong Kong in April 2018 is a quadrivalent nasal vaccine.

16. What are the differences between inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)?

The IIV contains dead virus and is given by injection, while LAIV contains weakened viruses and is a nasal-spray vaccine. Both IIV and LAIV are effective, but there are some differences in their indications. Depending on individual product, most IIVs are recommended for use among persons aged 6 months or above, including those who are healthy, pregnant women and those with chronic medical problems. LAIV can be used among non-pregnant and non-immunocompromised people 2-49 years of age. Please consult your doctor for details.

17. Who should not receive inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV)?

People who have a history of severe allergic reaction to any vaccine component or a previous dose of any influenza vaccine are not suitable to have inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. Individuals with mild egg allergy who are considering an influenza vaccination can be given IIV in primary care setting, such as health centres or clinics. Individuals with a history of anaphylaxis to egg should have seasonal influenza vaccine administered by health care professionals in appropriate medical facilities with capacity to recognise and manage severe allergic reactions. Influenza vaccine contains ovalbumin (a chicken protein), but the vaccine manufacturing process involves repeated purification and the ovalbumin content is very little. Even people who are allergic to eggs are generally safe to receive vaccination. Those with bleeding disorders or on anticoagulants should consult their doctors for advice. If an individual suffers from fever on the day of vaccination, the vaccination should be deferred till recovery.

18. Who should not receive live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)?

LAIV is a live vaccine and is generally contraindicated in the following conditions, taking reference from recommendations of the United States, United Kingdom and Canada:

  • History of severe allergic reaction to any vaccine component or after previous dose of any influenza vaccine;
  • Concomitant aspirin or salicylate-containing therapy in children and adolescents;
  • Children aged 2 through 4 years who have received a diagnosis of asthma or whose parents or caregivers report that a health care provider has told them during the preceding 12 months that their child had wheezing or asthma or whose medical record indicates a wheezing episode has occurred during the preceding 12 months;
  • Children and adults who are immunocompromised due to any cause;
  • Close contacts and caregivers of severely immunosuppressed persons who require a protected environment;
  • Pregnancy; and
  • Receipt of influenza antiviral medication within previous 48 hours.

Individuals with mild egg allergy who are considering an influenza vaccination can be given LAIV in primary care setting, such as health centres or clinics. Individuals with a history of anaphylaxis to egg should have seasonal influenza vaccine administered by health care professionals in appropriate medical facilities with capacity to recognise and manage severe allergic reactions. Influenza vaccine contains ovalbumin (a chicken protein), but the vaccine manufacturing process involves repeated purification and the ovalbumin content is very little. Even people who are allergic to eggs are generally safe to receive vaccination.

Please consult your doctor for details.

19. What is Guillain-Barré syndrome? Can influenza vaccination cause Guillain-Barré syndrome?

Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) is a rare neurological disorder causing paralysis and even respiratory difficulties. Most people recover completely but some have chronic weakness. GBS can also develop following a variety of infections, including influenza. So far, there is no conclusive evidence supporting a causal relationship between seasonal influenza vaccine and GBS.

20. Can I receive seasonal influenza vaccine if I had history of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS)?

As it is unknown whether influenza vaccination is causally associated with increased risk of recurrent GBS, precaution should be made to ascertain the temporal relationship if there is a history of GBS.

21. Does seasonal influenza vaccine cause influenza?

The viruses in the inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) are dead viruses, while the viruses in live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) are weakened. Therefore, both vaccines cannot cause influenza. However, some people develop side effects after vaccination.

22. What are the possible side effects of the inactivated influenza vaccine?

Inactivated influenza vaccine is very safe and usually well tolerated apart from occasional soreness, redness or swelling at the injection site. Some recipients may experience fever, muscle pain, and tiredness beginning 6 to 12 hours after vaccination and lasting up to two days. If fever or discomforts persist, please consult a doctor. Immediate severe allergic reactions like hives, swelling of the lips or tongue, and difficulties in breathing are rare and require emergency consultation.

Influenza vaccination may be rarely followed by serious adverse events such as Guillain-Barré Syndrome (1 to 2 cases per million vaccinees) and severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) (9 per 10 million doses distributed). However, influenza vaccination may not necessarily have causal relations with these adverse events. Studies have shown that the risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome after influenza infection (17.20 per million) is much higher than after influenza vaccination (1.03 per million).

(The Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2013 Sep; 13(9): 769-76)

23. What are the possible side effects of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)?

The most common adverse reactions following LAIV administration are nasal congestion or runny nose (in all ages), fever (in children) and sore throat (in adults).  The safety in pregnant women has not been established.  Children aged below five years with recurrent wheezing / persons of any age with asthma may be at increased risk of wheezing following administration.

24. How do seasonal influenza vaccines work?

The seasonal influenza vaccine induces development of antibodies against influenza virus infection in the body.

25. Does the seasonal influenza vaccine work right away?

No. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against influenza virus infection. For prevention against influenza, vaccinated individuals should maintain good personal and environmental hygiene practices, balanced diet, regular exercise, adequate rest and no smoking.

26. How much protection does the seasonal influenza vaccine provide?

When the vaccine strains closely match the circulating influenza viruses, efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in individuals younger than 65 years of age typically range from 70% to 90%. For live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), while overseas studies and clinical experience had generally indicated LAIV provides comparable protection against influenza to that afforded by IIV, a systemic review of studies from the 2010/11 - 2016/17 seasons conducted by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that the effectiveness of LAIV against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was lower than IIV among children aged 2-17 years.* Data on effectiveness of the LAIV against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the 2017/18 season in the United States was not available. 

(*Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2018 Jun 8;67(22):643-645.)

27. Is it necessary to get vaccinated against seasonal influenza every year?

Yes. The circulating seasonal influenza strains may change from time to time. In accordance with the circulating strains, the seasonal influenza vaccine composition is updated every year to enhance protection. The immunity built up in a vaccinated person in the prior season will decrease over time and may become too low to provide protection in next season. In addition, the vaccine compositions of 2018/19 seasonal influenza vaccine are different from those in 2017/18.

28. How many doses of seasonal influenza vaccination will my child need?

To ensure adequate immunity against seasonal influenza, children under 9 years old who have never received any seasonal influenza vaccine are recommended to be given 2 doses of seasonal influenza vaccine with a minimum interval of 4 weeks. Children below 9 years, those who have received any seasonal influenza vaccine before are recommended to receive one dose in the 2018/19 season.

29. If a child under the age of 9 years is getting seasonal influenza vaccine for the first time and requires 2 doses, does the same type of vaccine have to be used for both doses?

No, the first and second doses do not have to be the same type. However, the two doses should be separated by at least 4 weeks.

30. Can pneumococcal vaccines be received together with seasonal influenza vaccine?

Yes. Pneumococcal vaccines can be given with seasonal influenza vaccine at the same clinic visit, but should be administered with a different syringe and at a different injection site if the inactivated influenza vaccine is used.

31. Can my child receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if he / she has received / will receive other immunisation?

Injectable inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) does not interfere with the effectiveness of other vaccines. It can be given at the same time or at different time with either inactivated vaccine (e.g. Hepatitis B vaccine) or live vaccine (e.g. Measles, mumps and rubella vaccine). For individuals receiving live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), other live vaccines not administered on the same day should be administered at least four weeks apart. Different vaccines should be given at different injection sites if influenza vaccine and other vaccines are given at the same time.

32. My child has asthma. Should he avoid the influenza vaccination in case it gives him an attack?

Children having asthma are not contraindicated to receive inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV). People suffering from lung diseases such as asthma are recommended to receive inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine because of an increased risk of complications associated with influenza. However, children aged 2 through 4 years who have received a diagnosis of asthma or whose parents or caregivers report that a health care provider has told them during the preceding 12 months that their child had wheezing or asthma or whose medical record indicates a wheezing episode has occurred during the preceding 12 months should not receive live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV).

33. Is it necessary to re-vaccinate with the quadrivalent seasonal influenza vaccine if I have already got the trivalent one?

Trivalent influenza vaccine may potentially prevent majority of influenza burden in Hong Kong based on past laboratory data, while quadrivalent influenza vaccine may potentially offer additional protection against influenza B. Please consult your family doctor.

34. How to choose the trivalent or quadrivalent vaccine? How much is the difference in protection between them?

Both trivalent and quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are recommended for use in Hong Kong. Trivalent influenza vaccine may potentially prevent majority of influenza burden in Hong Kong based on past laboratory data, while quadrivalent influenza vaccine may potentially offer additional protection against influenza B. Please consult your family doctor.

35. Do the influenza vaccines in Hong Kong contain a mercuric compound or aluminum?

No. The influenza vaccines currently supplied for use in Hong Kong and do not contain a mercuric compound (e.g. thiomersal) or aluminum.

36. Why do some people who have been vaccinated still get influenza / influenza-like illness?

Influenza vaccines do not provide 100% protection against influenza, but they do reduce the risk of acquiring the disease as well as complications and death.  There are several reasons why someone may get influenza / influenza-like illness even after they have been vaccinated.  Firstly, the body takes about 2 weeks to develop antibodies after vaccination.  If infected before or shortly after vaccination, the protective effects of the vaccine may have not yet developed. Secondly, because it is not possible to predict exactly which strains of influenza virus will circulate in a given season, individuals may have exposed to a virus strain which is different from the vaccine strain, hence the vaccine does not provide protection.  Thirdly, there are other factors which will affect vaccine effectiveness including characteristics of the person being vaccinated (such as their age and health), and the similarity between the circulating viruses and the vaccine viruses. Finally, infections due to some other respiratory viruses may cause symptoms similar to flu, and people may falsely believe that the vaccine failed to protect them.